The Reims episode : Adventures in the realm of physicality

Seconds ago, an amazing choir started singing out of nowhere in the Reims cathedral. At first I thought it was a flasmob since nothing to me could explain this gathering of such a large number of people wearing different outfits in a church on a Saturday morning, but a previously organized and thought of mob, trained to impress with their voices. The truth is however, as one choir member told me, that it was a traveling choir. A "traditional" string-ties group that met thanks to the passion of its members and trained to perform and impress.

We tend to forget that it all started there. In that quintessential passion that moves us away from the couch and into life. Thank you Reims choir.

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Later, a fractal window made its appearance and gothic architecture miniature seemed like a Mandelbrotian ensemble. The physicality of these things, the brute tranformation of an idea into matter releases the full, nearly tangible power of an idea, even if you can't touch or interact with the object.

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The architect's plan remind me of a talk about African villages' fractal structure. Repetition is key. And isn't repetition, or in other terms copying, the base of it all with symetry being its most obvious manifestation (since symetry simply is the multiplication of the work yoi've already done by 2, as if you were dragging a cell in Excel). Copying is what our genes do, what stygmergic ants and termites rely on, what atoms use to go from a state to another. And how surprising is it that copying is exactly what you'd expect from a lazy organism, from a lazy structure. Copying is the laziest possible stratrgy, life's favorite strategy.

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The cathedral's underground also reminds me of that record keeping the universe does. Every step, every stone every civilization laid is a treasure Earth embraves jalously in it until times immemorial. Archeology is the science that reads into the library Earth's ground and soil are.

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